Curses through travel: Hawaii

Hawaii

I have never been to Hawaii. When I lived in the States, it was a toss-up of going either there or Cancun, and Cancun won out.
I had always thought the custom of giving leis to welcome visitors was such a lovely way to greet them, as they are so pretty. But the more I got to thinking about it, the more I thought that that type of action is usually a form of reverence or honour more than anything else. So I embarked on a history lesson.

As the lei is given as a form of affection, it is taken as offense should you refuse to accept it. This makes it very difficult on a visiting Christian.
When the Polynesians arrived, they made leis, and wore them, to honour their demon gods. They would place the leis around the statues of the gods to being good luck, for protection, prevent strife on the island and the hopes of preventing the gods’ demand for human sacrifice.
In addition, farmers used leis to give blessings from the gods on their crops, fishermen used them for safety and priests used them in healing ceremonies.
Many goddesses are associated with leis – they are offered to the goddess Pele and Hiiaka, mostly to banish evil spirits and honour the dead. The Maile leaf lei is especially worn to worship the gods.

Leis are place around the neck of visitors for all these same reasons; clearly leis are centered on Hawaii’s deep rooted belief in their gods and not as benign as a simple hello as everyone is led to believe.
This does not mean that you are cursed to place a flower in your hair or wear them. The difference lies if flowers are purposely constructed in the form of a lei, because their origin is demonic.

Accepting the lei around your neck is giving honour to their demon gods and therefore legal ground for all sorts of demonic spirits to attack you.
If you have ever been in this situation, I encourage you to break the curse of this over your life and be set free in Jesus’ name.

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